News Conference: Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the U.S., 2017



today we are releasing the latest income poverty and health insurance findings for the nation this includes some state-level statistics and the Supplemental poverty measure immediately after the presentations we will open the phone lines to answer questions from the media so please call in now if you are a member of the media who would like to participate dial eight eight eight six zero six seven zero three eight and enter passcode seven five zero nine one six eight when prompted you'll be placed on hold until the question-and-answer session begins resources for today's news conference are available on census gov click on the slide at the top of the homepage or go to the newsroom to find the electronic press kit and be sure to visit America counts story behind the numbers after today's news conference we will release news stories on the latest income poverty and health insurance findings without further delay here's David alright good morning and thank you for joining us today we are releasing three reports income and poverty in the United States health insurance coverage in the United States and the Supplemental poverty measure all for 2017 the income and poverty report and the SPM report are based on data from the current population surveys annual social and economic supplement the current population survey is the longest-running survey conducted by the Census Bureau and is the official source of the national poverty estimates the estimates of official poverty rates are calculated in accordance with the Office of Management and budgets statistical policy directive 14 the Health Insurance report includes data from both the current population survey and the American Community Survey the American Community Survey is an ongoing survey that has a much larger sample size than the current population survey making it the recommended source of health insurance statistics for smaller populations and levels of geography now let's take a look at the main findings the median household income was sixty one thousand four hundred dollars in 2017 and increase in real terms of 1.8% from the 2016 median of sixty thousand three hundred dollars this is the third consecutive annual increase in median household income the official poverty rate in 2017 was twelve point three percent down zero point four percentage points from 2016 in 2017 there was thirty nine point seven million people in poverty not statistically different from the number in poverty in 2016 the Supplemental poverty measure rate or SPM rate in 2017 was thirteen point nine percent this is not statistically different from the 2016 SPM rate of fourteen point zero percent the percentage of people without health insurance coverage for the entire calendar year was eight point eight percent or twenty-eight point five million people the uninsured rate and a number of uninsured in 2017 were not statistically different from 2016 now let's turn to our subject matter experts to take a closer look at the findings on income poverty and health insurance we'll start with income and poverty as a reminder following these presentations will take your questions income and poverty statistics gauge the health of the US economy were able to see national trends and compare the economic well-being of different groups such as women versus men children versus people aged 65 and older and urban versus rural residents income is a measure of all cash or money resources coming into a household it includes wages and earnings from work as well as Social Security benefits retirement income interest dividends and public assistance it does not account for taxes paid tax credits or non-cash assistance such as SNAP benefits Medicaid and Medicare we often talk about changes and trends in median household income the meeting is the value that divides the income distribution in half so half of all households have income above the median half below poverty is a measure of how many individuals live in families with incomes below the poverty threshold meaning they don't have adequate resources to meet their basic needs thresholds vary by the size of the family and the ages of the family members in 2017 a family with two adults and two children was considered in poverty if their income was below twenty four thousand eight hundred and fifty eight dollars poverty rates help government officials and social services providers develop policies and target benefits the income and poverty report is based on data from the current population surveys annual social and economic supplement CPS a sec let me begin by summarizing the main findings regarding income earnings and work experience median household income for the nation was 61 thousand four hundred dollars in 2017 an increase in real terms of 1.8% from 2016 the 2017 real median earnings of all male workers increased three percent from 2016 while the change in the median earnings for their female counterparts was not statistically significant the number of workers with earnings increased by 1.7 million between 2016 and 2017 the number of individuals who worked full-time year-round increased by 2.4 million let me start by giving more details about the changes we observed in household median income this chart shows median household income from 90 67 to 2017 in real inflation-adjusted dollars recessions as defined by the National Bureau of Economic Research are depicted in this and all-time series charts in light shading real median household income was 61 thousand four hundred dollars in 2017 and increase in real terms of 1.8% from the 2016 median of sixty thousand three hundred this is the third consecutive annual increase in median household income the 2017 median household income appears to be the highest median household income ever reported from the CPS asic however comparisons to estimates prior to 2013 must be made with caution as the income questions were redesigned in the 2014 CPS a sec for income in 2013 our analysis of the redesigned income questions found that they increased estimates of median household income for 2013 by about 3.2 percent one method for adjusting Prix 2013 median household income estimates to make them comparable to current estimates is to increase them by this same 3.2 percent with this adjustment as shown by the orange dotted line on this slide and after adjusting for inflation the 2017 median household income is not statistically different from the pre-recession estimate for 2007 or the year with the highest estimated median household income 1999 these adjustments are not made in our official publications and table packages because they require the assumption that the 3.2 percent difference between responses to the historical questions and the redesigned questions in 2013 would have been identical in all years before 2013 additionally this adjustment applies to overall household median income and not necessarily to the medians for household subgroups next we show household income by race and Hispanic origin of the householder the real median income of households maintained by non-hispanic whites and Hispanics increased 2.6 percent and 3.7 percent respectively between 2016 and 2017 this is the third annual increase in median household income for these two groups among the race group households maintained by Asians had the highest median income in 2017 any $1,300 while the median represents one point on the distribution of household income other points provide additional information for example 10% of the households had income below $14,200 10 percent of households had income above a hundred and seventy nine thousand one hundred dollars and five percent had income above two hundred and thirty seven thousand dollars changes in the relationship of these income measures and the shares of income they possess shown in the full report can indicate how income inequality is changing between 2016 and 2017 incomes at the 50th 90th and 95th percentile increased 1.8 2.8 and 3.0 percent respectively while the change in income at the 10th percentile was not statistically significant using the information about the distribution of household income we can produce a Gini index a widely used measure of inequality the Gini index is a statistical measure of income inequality ranging from 0 to 1 indicating higher inequality as the index approaches 1 the Gini index was 0.48 2 and 2017 not statistically different from 2016 these next slides switch to earnings and work experience data for people aged 15 and older here we see historical data on the real median earnings of all workers and full-time year-round workers from 1960 to 2017 earnings are the sum of wages salary and self-employment income in 2017 79% of aggregate income came from earnings the 2017 real median earnings of all male workers increased 3% from 2016 to 44,000 400 while the median earnings for their female counterparts 30 1,600 were not statistically different from 2016 in 2017 the real median earnings of men and women who worked full-time year-round each decreased from their respective 2016 medians by 1.1 percent here we see the female to male earnings ratio historically the female to male earn ratio compares the median earnings of women and men working full-time year-round the 2017 female to male earnings ratio was 80.5% not statistically different from 2016 year-to-year changes in this ratio are not common however since 2007 the female to male earnings ratio has increased 3.5% from 77.8% to the current 80.5% this slide shows the number of workers historically by work experience and sex between 2016 and 2017 the total number of people with earnings regardless of work experience increased by 1.7 million the number of men with earnings increased by 1.2 million while the change for women was not statistically significant the number of men and women full-time year-round workers increased by 1.4 million and 1 million respectively between 2016 and 2017 continuing a shift from part-time part year work status to full-time year-round work status now we'll take a look at poverty this slide shows the official poverty rate and the number of people in poverty the official poverty rate in 2017 was 12 point three percent down from 12 point 7 percent in 2016 in 2017 there were 39 point 7 million people in poverty not statistically different from the number in poverty in 2016 in 2017 a family with two adults and two children was categorized as in poverty if it's income was less than 24 thousand eight hundred and fifty eight dollars this is a third consecutive annual decline in poverty since 2014 the poverty rate has fallen 2.5 percentage points from 14 point 8 percent to 12.3% the estimates of the official poverty rates are calculated in accordance with the Office of Management and Budget statistical policy directive 14 here we demonstrate the differences in poverty trends across race and Hispanic origin groups in 2017 the poverty rate was 8 point 7 percent for non-hispanic whites 21.2% for blacks and 10% for Asians for non-hispanic whites blacks and Asian's the poverty rates were not statistically different from 2016 for Hispanics the poverty rate decreased to 18.3% in 2017 down from 19.4% in 2016 this slide looks at poverty rates by age for individuals under age 18 seventeen point five percent were in poverty in 2017 not statistically different from 2016 poverty in 2017 decreased for people aged 18 to 64 to 11 point two percent down from eleven point six percent in 2016 people aged 65 and older had a poverty rate of 9.2 percent in 2017 not statistically different from 2016 the poverty rate for females has historically been higher than the poverty rate for males in 1966 the poverty rate for females was three point three percentage points higher than for males in 2017 the difference in rates across females and males was two point six percentage points not statistically different than the three point three percentage point gap in 1966 age however matters in 1966 poverty was eight point five percentage points higher among females aged 65 and older compared to their male counterparts by 2017 this difference had narrowed to three percentage points while twelve point three percent of the population in 2017 were in poverty five point seven percent of the population had incomes below 50% of their poverty threshold meaning the family or individual received less than half of the income necessary to meet their poverty threshold for a family with two adults and two children this would be an income less than twelve thousand four hundred twenty nine dollars per year in 2017 in 1975 the first year for which we have published data on income to poverty ratios the poverty rate was also twelve point three percent but the percent with income below 50% of their poverty threshold was three point seven percent this slide looks at the proportion of people in poverty with income below 50% of their poverty threshold since 1975 the percent of the poverty population with income below 50% of their poverty threshold has increased sixteen point seven percentage from 30.1% to the current 46.7% more information on income and poverty is available in the report and online governmental programs are designed to provide a safety net for some of the nation's most vulnerable families and individuals the Supplemental poverty measure or SPM helps us to estimate how well these programs are working to pull people out of poverty the SPM extends the official poverty measure it starts with cash income then adds non-cash benefits such as food and nutritional assistance programs energy assistance and housing subsidies while subtracting out necessary expenses like taxes health care commuting and childcare costs the SPM uses poverty thresholds produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics based on spending on food clothing shelter and utilities these thresholds are adjusted for family size and composition as well as for Geographic differences in the cost of housing the SPM report is based on data from the current population surveys annual social and economic supplement the SPM does not replace the official poverty measure and is not used to determine eligibility for government programs let me begin by summarizing the main findings from this report the SPM rate and 2017 was thirteen point nine percent this is not statistically different from the 2016 SPM rate of 14 percent the SPM rate for 2017 was 1.6 percentage points higher than the official poverty rate of twelve point three percent there were sixteen states plus the District of Columbia for which SPM rates were higher than official poverty rates 18 states with lower rates and 16 states for which the differences were not statistically significant the SPM uses thresholds produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics from Consumer Expenditure survey data separate thresholds are created for renters homeowners with a mortgage and those who own their homes free and clear while the official poverty threshold is constant throughout the United States the SPM adjusts for Geographic differences in housing costs this map shows those differences with yellow areas having lower thresholds for renters than official poverty threshold and blue and green areas having higher thresholds this slide compares the SPM estimates for 2017 with the SPM estimates for 2016 for all people and by age group the 20 17 SPM rate for the entire population was thirteen point nine percent this is not statistically different from the 2016 SPM rate of 14 percent SPM rates were not statistically different for any of the major age categories in 2017 compared with 2016 SPM rates for children under age 18 were 15.6 percent adults aged 18 to 64 had an SPM rate of thirteen point two percent and adults aged 65 and older had a rate of fourteen point one percent in 2017 this slide compares the SPM estimates for 2017 with the official poverty estimates for all people and by age group the 2017 SPM rate for the entire population was 1.6 percentage points higher than the 2017 official poverty rate looking at specific age categories the SPM rate was lower than the official poverty rate for children but higher than the official poverty rate for people aged 18 to 64 and people aged 65 and older while the SPM national poverty rate was higher than the official that difference varies by geographic area this figure shows the United States divided into three categories by state there were 16 states plus the District of Columbia where the SPM rates were higher than official these are shaded orange there were 18 states where the SPM was lower than the fish'll these are shaded blue and finally there are 16 states where the differences in the rates were not statistically significant these are gray one important contribution that the SPM provides is allowing us to gauge the effectiveness of tax credits and transfers in alleviating poverty we can also examine the effects of non discretionary expenses such as work and medical expenses this graph shows the impact on the 2017 SPM rate of the addition or subtraction of a single resource element some of these elements such as Social Security and unemployment insurance are included in the official estimates other elements such as the supplemental nutritional assistance program or SNAP benefits and refundable tax credits are included only in the SPM resource measure using this chart we can see that 27 million people were taken out of poverty by Social Security benefit this figure also shows the breakdown by age with the majority of these individuals aged 65 and older 8.3 million people were taken out of poverty by refundable tax credits 3.4 million people were taken out of poverty by SNAP benefits however subtracting medical expenses from income increase the number of people in poverty by ten point nine million using the SPM more information on the Supplemental poverty measure is available in the report and online health insurance coverage is an important measure of our nation's overall well-being whether it's illness injury or preventative needs health insurance provides greater access to medical care protection from high unexpected costs and more economic stability each year the Census Bureau provides data on health insurance coverage we look at who is and isn't covered where they live and what type of insurance they have policymakers use this information to make data-driven decisions the health insurance estimates released today come from two surveys the current population survey annual social and economic supplement asked people about their health insurance coverage at any time in the previous calendar year most of the national level results presented today come from this survey the American Community Survey ask people about their coverage at the time of the interview due to its larger sample size the American Community Survey is the recommended source of health insurance statistics for smaller populations and levels of geography let me begin by summarizing the main findings this year an estimated eight point eight percent of the population or about twenty-eight point five million people did not have health insurance coverage at any point in 2017 the uninsured rate and the number of uninsured in 2017 were not statistically different from 2016 between 2016 and 2017 the percentage of people uninsured at the time of their interview decreased in three states and increased in 14 states in 2017 most people 91.2% had health insurance coverage at some point during the calendar year with more people having private health insurance 67 point 2 percent than government coverage thirty seven point seven percent looking at subtypes of health insurance employer based insurance was the most common covering 56% of the population followed by Medicaid Medicare direct purchase which includes health insurance exchanges and military health care the larger sample size of the American Community Survey allows us to observe characteristics in greater detail and because the survey asks about current coverage we have the opportunity to examine how health insurance status varies by single year of age in 2017 26 year olds had the highest uninsured rate at 17.8% three notable sharp differences exist between single age years specifically between eighteen and nineteen year olds between twenty-five and twenty-six year olds and between 64 and 65 year olds these differences correspond to common age-related eligibility thresholds for coverage including chip dependent coverage and Medicare overtime changes in the rate of health insurance coverage and the distribution of coverage types may reflect economic trends shifts in the demographic composition of the population and policy changes that affect access to care several such policy changes occurred in 2014 when many provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act went into effect this chart shows the change and percentages of people with health insurance coverage between 2016 and 2017 on the left and between 2013 and 2017 on the right the percentage of people covered by any type of health insurance for at least some time during 2017 was 91.2% starting with the left side of the chart we see that the overall coverage rate is not statistically different from the rate in 2016 between 2016 and 2017 the rate of Medicare coverage increased by 0.6 percentage points to cover 17.2 percent of people for part or all of 2017 this increase was partly due to an increase in the number of people aged 65 and over the military coverage rate increased by 0.2 percentage points to 4.8% during this time between 2016 and 2017 there's no statistically significant change for any other subtype of health insurance shown here moving to the right side of the chart we see the change in health insurance coverage rates since 2013 the baseline year before many provisions of the Affordable Care Act went into effect the uninsured rate decreased by 4.5 percentage points between 2013 and 2017 the rate of private coverage increased by 3 percentage points in this period of the two subtypes of private coverage only direct purchase health insurance significantly changed during this period the government coverage rate increased by three point two percentage points the coverage rate increased for all of the subtypes of government coverage Medicare Medicaid and military health care variation in the uninsured rate at the sub-national level may be related to whether the state expanded Medicaid eligibility as part of the Affordable Care Act this chart categorizes states into two groups those that expanded eligibility and those that did not thirty-one states and the District of Columbia expanded Medicaid eligibility on or before January 1 2017 nine point four percent of the population aged 19 to 64 living in expansion states had no health insurance coverage at any time in 2017 not statistically different from the percentage in 2016 in non-expansion States sixteen point seven percent of the population had no health insurance coverage during 2017 up from sixteen point one percent in 2016 in both expansion States and non-expansion States the uninsured rate for working age adults in 2017 was lower than in 2013 while it is useful to look at the state's grouped by expansion status there's more to the story the American Community Survey allows us to examine uninsured rates at the state level on this map the darkest blue shading is applied to States where the percentage of people uninsured at the time of interview was 14% or higher lighter shades represent lower uninsured with the lightest blue category representing an uninsured rate of less than 8% two states Oklahoma and Texas are in the darkest shade of blue for 2017 and 25 states and the District of Columbia are in the lightest shade of blue this map presents the change in uninsured rates between 2016 and 2017 the percentage of people without health insurance coverage decreased in three states and increased in 14 states statistically significant decreases ranged from 0.2 to 1.9 percentage points and increases ranged from point three to one percentage point more information is available in our reports and online that concludes our presentations to recap the highlights median household income is up at sixty one thousand four hundred dollars the official poverty rate is down zero point four percentage points to twelve point three percent the Supplemental poverty measure rate was thirteen point nine percent not statistically different from 2016 and the percentage of people without health insurance coverage was eight point eight percent not statistically different from 2016 and now I'll turn it back over to Michael thank you David let's get ready to open up the phone lines to questions joining us now in addition to David Washington or a few of his counterparts from the social economic and housing statistics division first we have Trudi Renwick she is our assistant division chief for economic statistics as well Sharon Stern assistant division chief for employment characteristics please callers state your name and media affiliation when you've asked a question you want to give everyone an opportunity so we're allowing just one question and one follow-up question operator do we have our first caller operate our young on the first call is from Janet Adam II with the Wall Street Journal hi thanks for taking my call can you go over again the historical comparisons on median household income if I understood correctly you were saying that because of this 2013 change really the figure isn't meaningly different than pre 2007 levels or even that 99 high if you could just identify yourself before you speak that would help Thanks thank thank you for that question Janet and I'll turn that question on income over to Trudi Renwick thank you hi my name is Trudi Renwick and yes you got it exactly right when we compare income going back we have to make two adjustments we have to make the adjustment for the changes in the cost of living putting everything into 2017 dollars but because of the change in their questionnaire in 2014 where we change the income questions we also need to make an adjustment for that and so when we make that adjustment which is increasing the previous income by about 3.2 percent we find that the median household income in 2017 was not statistically different than the income in 2007 nor the income in 1999 thank you for that the next question comes from Tammy Libby with CNN your line is open listen could you give us some explanation on generally why the the numbers are continuing to increase is it you know because of jobs but also why has the rate of increase slowed to 1.8 percent versus the you know 5 percent range of 3 percent range in the last two years thanks for that question I think that you're speaking about this is Dave Waddington and I think you're asking about income is that right because those are the numbers we're talking about income Trudy do you want to say any more about that well sure I mean we don't really get into the questions of why the numbers are what they are we try to report them as carefully as we can and provide as much data and even the micro data to people so that other people can can dig into that a bit and if you contact the Census Bureau's public information office at three zero one seven six three three zero three zero we do have the Census Bureau have a network of folks that we can actually point you to that can give you an impression or give you their take at the ground level in the local level as to how changes are are being made or what the impacts might be as Trudy mentioned we don't necessarily speculate on those things okay the next question comes from John Byers with AFP your line is open the graph shows the increase in income by percentile I'm just seeing I just want to get your impression I just want a short reading that's right it looks to me like the it went up for all the quality' percentiles but that much the acceleration between 2013 in 2017 is much greater as the wealthiest levels that accurate means that you're reading as well any ideas as to why that would be open thanks for that question I'll toss that back over to Trudy hi this is this is Trudy run with again so what we found between last year and this year is that income went up at the 50th and the 90th percentile the percentiles that we show on the chart and the 95th but it did not go up for people at the 10th percentile so their their income actually was flat between 2016 and 2017 again we we don't get into the speculation as to why one thing happens or another the next question comes from Heather along with the Washington Post your line is open hi hi good morning last year on this call members of the sense of staff stressed that they that the thinking was that some of this upward momentum and income and downward momentum and the poverty figures was due to just the basic fact that more people are employed now we've been adding thousands of people are millions of people a year to to the job roles is that what you're thinking I know you don't speculate on a lot but can you is that similar thinking this year as to why these incomes are rising obviously we all have to explain what's going on to cause income to go above sixty one thousand last year do you think it's still mainly a job story thanks for that question I'll pass that again down the tree okay so we we can't talk about that I mean we do have the number of workers up by 1.7 million and the number of full-time year-round workers are actually up two by 2.4 million so we are continuing to see that shift from part-time part year work to full-time full-year work and so some of that could explain an increase in income the next question comes from Rachel Oh Dean was political your line is open the reason why you think health insurance feed any 20% not so specifically different than 2016 thanks for that health insurance question Rachel I'll send that or I'll write that over to Sharon sir well we can't always point to a reason why that's what outside experts do for us but we do provide data to help you understand better the data that we've reported and if you look in our detailed tables you will see that for some groups private coverage may have gone up or public coverage may have gone up although the uninsured rate didn't change between the two there is a more complex story going on under the surface and I encourage you to look into to those kinds of changes and go from there the next question comes from Amy pitchy time around decline for 2016 I'm trying to understand how that happened how full-time workers other it comes to climb but household income increase right and I'll send that down the tree okay thank you that's a really interesting question there's really two pieces of it the one reason that the median earnings for full-time year-round workers can go down as the number of full-time year-round workers go up is because people coming into that status may be coming in at the bottom of the earnings distribution so it's really not unusual for that to be counter cyclical likewise in a recession if the lower paid people are losing their jobs first then we could see median income go up median earnings go up recession and in in this recovery we can see them go down as more people become full-year for full-time workers as to the difference between household income and earnings those are two different measures the earnings are at the person level and their only income from work while household income is the total income and it's at the household level so it's for all earners in the household plus any Social Security SSI public assistance interest dividends and other income so we do see that dichotomy with and we have a we have actually a blog post that you can find that digs into this a little deeper about why we see this discrepancy between increase in income but a fall in earnings oh hello thank you for taking my call I just want to go back to the first question and get absolute clarity from you that the median income is not the highest of all time is that correct and because of adjustments made in the 2013 questionnaire you know this median is high does it do you say it times 1999 or how are we to make that connection thank you can you shed some light on that sure you're exactly right you can say that it's it's statistically tied with 1999 and 2007 we say not statistically different but that what we mean by that is it's tied statistically you Public Radio know hello I wanted to make sure I understand the meaning of the the Gini coefficient chart that you're showing that and I'm also trying to understand what are the major factors that are affecting this slight uptick in the Gini coefficient that we're seeing I think well over time there's been some but even in the last year there's been a change well what is what factors are driving that slight increase in the Gini perfect I've seen that question on the factors that are affecting the Gini index over to Trudi okay well the Gini index you know as you get closer to one you get more inequality we actually did not see a change in the Gini index between this year and last year it's 0.48 to when we see it going up that means that income inequality is increasing in in the economy the next question comes from Phil Garrett's some kaiser Health News your line is open hello report that 14 states or increase in their uninsured rate how does that compare to last year and what factors did should be the first thing that many states saying an increase and that health insurance questions Sharon Stone will take it thank you I got lost part of way through my apologies you were asking about the difference in how compares over time after the impacts of the Affordable Care Act the changes to that policy that went into effect in 2014 all states over the next three years either didn't change or decrease in their uninsured rate so as you point out this between 16 and 17 there were states now that have a slight increase we have a really great infographic online that you can use to look at this each state over those years and you could even look by type so if you want to dig into more what may be happening between 16 and 17 that infographic would be very helpful I think to learn more about what's going on there please press star 1 on your phone the next question comes from David Slade with the post Curtin Courier open you I think that those are ACS estimates which are actually under embargo right now and they will be public tomorrow morning you can't answer questions about them now I'm afraid I can't you can call us and we'd be happy to talk to you about it offline yes caller if you could call the public information office at three zero one seven six three three zero three zero will address any question that you might have pertaining to the American Community Survey current media embargo that that's in effect and just to remind folks while we're on that topic that we do have an ongoing embargo for the American Community Survey which will be released on Thursday September 13 operator the next question comes from Quinn Howard with the Minneapolis star-tribune your line is open okay I I'm trying to clarify the nationwide health uninsurance rate in your presentation you say it's eight point eight percent but in Table six it's listed as eight point seven percent thank you that health insurance question if you give us a moment we'll get to that table and then walk you through it thanks for that question okay I can explain Table six is our table that comes from the American Community Survey the national rate listed there is for reference to the state data that come below it and as for why it's different the two surveys are actually asking slightly different questions the current population survey asks about any coverage during 2017 and we classify you as uninsured if at no time during 2017 did you have health insurance coverage the ACS on the other hand asked our respondents are you covered right now so those two numbers when you look across 2017 will look slightly different and we have in the report a little bit more information about how those track over time and how they're different from each other so we also just add to that we also have an American count story that we put out on line two that describes the two measures of two measures of health insurance so you might take a look at that under the America accounts page the next question comes from Christie tanner with the Detroit Free Press join is open hi Kristin I think my question was just asked and answered possibly and just looking at it appears this number under embargo over the east the answer Table six is this the first time then Gracie asked data at the national level that the uninsured rate has increased since 2013 and what do you recommendations about reporting the two different numbers for the two different surveys thanks for that health insurance question I'm Sharon will address it yes you're correct using the American Community Survey just as we saw with the national data from the current population survey that in the few years following the enactment of those provisions of the Affordable Care Act insurance was falling and so yes that is the first time in these past few years that that's changed direction with regard to which data to use we recommend that when you're reporting national data that you use the current population survey it has a very rich interview it has other characteristics more detailed income and poverty data etc on the other hand we recommend the American Community Survey when you're doing smaller area or state the areas below state will be released tomorrow some selected state data for health insurance are available today and they are in report that Table six that you saw but what to make of it they are different measures and so it does make sense that the current population survey did not capture a statistically different change from insurance for the entire of 2017 and it's completely consistent that the American Community Survey with its much larger sample size and collection about current coverage could at the time of interview could measure or detect a small change that isn't detectable yet or even seen necessarily in the that is correct take that question yeah so I think yeah I do not recall all of the tables that we have but we do have health insurance coverage by race from the American Community Survey that will be available tomorrow I don't know if we have any of our select tables I don't believe we do but I can look up for you and if you want to call back after we can find out if any of those were released at it but I think most of them are with the main release tomorrow of the American Community Survey what was the data well as poverty rate among Native Americans and Alaska Mitas and then also just aggregated by female-headed households because I don't see that data thanks for that question so I think so I can just answer this briefly is I think most of that data that you're looking at for those specific and smaller population groups they're going to be coming from the American Community Survey findings and again those data are embargo today for public release tomorrow so you should be able to find most of that you mentioned some women head of household we may have some of that in our in our CPS data so table you can look on table 4 on page 13 of the report you will find the poverty rates for female householder families no husband present huh thank you yeah I know further questions at this time well I'd like to thank you for joining us for today's news conference before we wrap up I'd like to direct your attention to several key products scheduled for release as noted earlier the results from the 2017 American Community Survey are available under embargo for public release on Thursday September 13th tomorrow this data set provides single year estimates of median household income poverty and health insurance coverage for all states and counties places and other geographic units with populations of 65,000 or more it also includes estimates for numerous social economic and housing characteristics the five-year American Community Survey data will be released later this year the embargo begins December 4th for public release December 6th these estimates will be available for all areas regardless of population size down to the block group level if you have additional questions about today's news conference or which to arrange interviews please call the public information office at three zero one seven six three three zero three zero the general public may call our customer service center at one eight hundred nine two three eight two eight two for assistance just a reminder to visit America counts stories behind the numbers on census gov for new stories on the latest income poverty and health insurance findings you can also join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook by following at US Census Bureau be sure to tag at US Census Bureau in your stories for social media and finally I'd like to thank our survey respondents the Census Bureau conducts more than 130 surveys each year including the American Community Survey and the current population survey information from this and other surveys generates data that helps determine how billions of federal and state dollars are distributed each year respondents make this possible and we thank you for David wanting ttan Sharon Stern and Trudi Renwick I'm Michael thanks for joining us you

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